Joseph Malgeri is looking for some stories about the lack of internet

Joseph Malgeri posted the following in the Facebook Public Group “Internet Seekers: Citizens Striving for Fiber in TN”:

YOUR ATTENTION PLEASE! I’m looking for some stories about how the lack of internet is impacting your and your family’s lives. They don’t have to be long but they should be clear and complete. Post them here or email them to fibreopticconsultant@gmail.com. Thanks in advance for your help.

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ATTENTION READERS. Please note message at the end.

I wonder if they get it…

I wonder if our elected officials realize the damage they do to their state, in so many ways:

Lawmakers know how much high speed internet is needed across the state, yet they continue to block efforts to expand it, even when it will cost taxpayers nothing.

I wonder how many of our citizens realize that the governor’s initiative, the recently passed Broadband Accessibility Act is mostly smoke and mirrors; that the $45 million he budgeted over three years will barely cover 200 miles – when we can cover the state for free. How many people realize that the way the law is structured, the definition of high-speed is like legislating rotary phones for all?

Since 2004, when some select communities took up the challenge to bring broadband to their areas. Even though they were limited by laws authored by AT&T, some 350,000 residents and almost 13,000 businesses have taken high speed internet, while millions of Tennesseans, both urban and rural have been denied access.

In the face of overwhelming evidence that these brave communities have prospered while others have wilted;

In the face of compelling evidence that a lack of access to high speed internet drives existing businesses away and causes prospective new businesses to look elsewhere;

In view of the facts that young innovators are swarming to connected communities where opportunities are aplenty while our young people around the state leave home for opportunities they cannot find locally; and,

In view of the fact that the municipal electric utilities providing internet in those connected communities pay millions of dollars per year combined in Payments in Lieu of Taxes to their respective communities’ general funds;

In view of all the good going on around us, don’t you think it’s high time to oust legislators who openly deny our rights to have what they have.

Don’t continue to re-elect lawmakers who hide behind false concepts about free markets when what they’re really doing is protecting their donor’s turf.

I wonder, dear readers, if…. if, over the Thanksgiving break you will think about the successes mounting in connected cities and ask, why not us?

I wonder, politicians across the state, how you can stand in the way of your constituents’ rights to self determination – and then ask for their votes in November.

Are you getting this, Beth Harwell?

Dear Readers,
I’ve been working on this for years now. I know how important this issue is for all of us but mostly you. My time here is limited while yours may be decades longer. I am eager to take this message across the state, NOW, so we can shake up the 2018 election and get the bills passes that free us to take charge of our own destinies.
I want your help. Set up town halls and interviews in your back yards and I’ll be there. Make video and Podcasts, and I’ll share the truth that you can then speak to power.
I’ve got the roadmaps, all we need now are the road warriors.
Thank you for reading. Happy Thanksgiving. JM

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Here are some related resources:

Connected Nashville 2 (October 12, 2017)

Connected Nashville: A Vision for a Smarter City (May 11, 2016)

Washington Journal Phil Bredesen Discusses Health Care Policy Tennessee

Washington Journal Governor Bill Haslam Discusses Priorities Tennessee

From Craig Settles:

Telehealth is extremely popular in healthcare, particularly in low-income urban and rural areas. However, without quality broadband high-speed Internet access telehealth doesn’t happen.

My latest report makes a business case for using community broadband to advance healthcare because that’s how we drive both broadband and telehealth adoption. Telehealth users and vendors, community broadband owners, and local broadband providers share compelling interests and benefits.

Using real-world cases, this report lays out a strategy for boosting telemedicine and broadband adoption. Uniting healthcare providers, schools and libraries in healthcare hubs has fundraising, infrastructure development and political advantages your community should evaluate.

The FCC majority, some members in Congress and a number of state legislators are not our friends. If you want highspeed Internet access, it falls squarely on communities’ collective shoulders!

Community Broadband Snapshot Report ™ November 2017