World Communion Sunday is October 7, 2018

Reposted from ChristiaNet September, 2018 Issue 175

What does “global communing” bring to your mind? A long distance phone conversation between friends in Adelaide, South Australia and Nashville, Tennessee? A table at a 1955 luncheon in Toronto, Canada where women are creating a unique fellowship? Our sisters, strong in faith and ability building homes for families in Mexico or South Africa? Maybe you imagine the smile of women finally leaving the brothel in India on the arms of their mentors and friends. Or a lunch after Sunday worship with folk new to your community.

October 7, 2018 is World Communion Sunday, a celebration that encourages Christian unity and ecumenical cooperation. One might describe it as a faith community building event. World Convention founder, Jesse Bader, promoted World Communion Sunday among the Stone-Campbell family as early as 1940, and the tradition continues today.

How do we build God’s community?

James 2:8-9 says the conduct of the faithful should be unbiased. “You do well when you complete the Royal Rule of the Scriptures: “Love others as you love yourself.” But if you play up to so-called important people, you go against the Rule and stand convicted by it.” Then James asks pointedly in verse 17, “Isn’t it obvious that God-talk without God-acts is outrageous nonsense?” (The Message)

Whether individually or with a group, you are invited to dialogue with other ChristiaNet readers through your stories, ideas and pictures where active faith is building God’s community. We’d love to share the ways you and yours share the hospitality of Jesus’ open table in your part of the world. Not just on October 7, but throughout the year. Not just in your church, but in your neighborhood, your city or town, the country you call home.

Here’s how. Tag your “faith-in-action” posts and photos on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, blogs, etc. with #ChristiaNetCommunity. Search for #ChristiaNetCommunity entries in your browser or social media platform to see one another’s offerings. Together let’s expand our knowing of God at work around the world.

Faith and works, works and faith, fit together hand in glove. May God be ever present in this experience of our global communing!

Julia Keith

Dr. Peter Steinke, Church – Making the Future Work, Siburt Institute for Church Ministry and CitySquare

Dr. Peter Steinke, internationally respected author and church consultant, applies systems theory to developing and maintaining healthy congregations. “Church – Making the Future Work” was a one-day seminar presented by the Siburt Institute for Church Ministry and CitySquare as a part of the “Equipping for Ministry” Series. Published on Jun 16, 2014

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Dr. Carroll D. Osburn on the Future of Restorationism (circa 1992)

The following address was presented by Dr. Carroll D. Osburn, Carmichael Distinguished Professor of New Testament at Abilene Christian University, January 12, 1992 at the ACU faculty pre-session conference.

Dr. Carroll Osburn – part 1 (Philosophical Orientation)
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Dr. Carroll Osburn – part 2 (Biblical Orientation)
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Dr Carroll Osburn – part 3 (Theological Orientation)
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Dr Carroll Osburn – part 4 (Experiential Orientation)
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Dr Carroll Osburn – Part 5 (Principles for the Future)
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Dr Carroll Osburn – Part 6 (Principles for the Future cont.)
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Dr. Carroll Osburn – Part 7 (Principles for the Future cont.)
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Millennial Blogger

By Greg Taylor, Managing Editor of www.wineskins.org

Alexander Campbell used publishing to advance the restoration of the church. Had he lived today, how would he use media to move the restoration? What can we learn from Campbell’s use of media that can be applied to our use of media today as we advance our own understanding of restoration?

<ed.note>[Update: originally posted in 2006.] The remainder here… If you haven’t ever appreciated Campbell’s wonderous “The Third Epistle of Peter” I commend it — and assume he might have thought that Greg would have been safe to add a fifth observation in his article — running along the lines of Glyn Moody’s Presentation on the “Opens“</ed.note>

Breaking Ground: The Newsletter of the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities

Archives available here. Note specifically the January 2009 issue entitled “Spirituality: A view of the world”

This brings to mind the National Organization on Disability Accessible Congregation campaign from the earlier part of this decade. An excellent start, but 2000 of 335,000 U. S. congregations (I believe the theological term is) sucks.

Here’s are practical tests:

1) does your pulpit area have a wheel chair accessible ramp PROMINENTLY VIEWABLE FROM THE AUDIENCE SIDE (symbolism is a big part of religious houses of worship message-wise, no?

2) When is the last time a blind or a deaf person lead prayer? How about someone with a speech disability using either a human or technological interpreter?

3) Do you have ANY Braille bulletins or collateral materials. Videos with captions? American Sign Language Bibles? Deafmissions.com can help with some of these things.

4) How many folks with visible disabilities of your leadership team (board, elders, presbyters, synod, national denominational board, etc.?

5) When’s the last time you’ve asked questions (as an organization) remotely like the four above?

Mark Hamilton on Justice

<ed.note>One of the benefits of Lent is the setting aside of time to meditate on just how much we’ve|I’ve screwed up in the previous year. One of the blessings of Easter is the sense that a new, hopeful year awaits for more victory, less defeat. But victory needs a goal and I can think of no better than that of a greater involvement in God’s will as it relates to believers promoting justice. Mark Hamilton’s thoughts on the topic make a fantastic springboard moving us in the direction of that goal.</ed.note>

What is justice? How can we be more just people, and a more just church? These questions seem acute in our time, as American Christians have access to unprecedented wealth and power while so many of our brothers and sisters sometimes lack even daily bread. As this new series of podcasts tries to show, the Bible offers a profound and eminently workable approach to changing our own lives — our attitudes, behaviors, values, and desires — so as to become more just people. I hope you enjoy this series and welcome your comments or questions. Dr. Mark W. Hamilton Associate Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean ACU Graduate School of Theology Abilene, TX 79699 Editor, The Transforming Word

Podcast here.

Lorajoy Tira Dimangondayao – Diaspora Missiology: “The Road Map to Cape Town for People on the Move”

The world has increasingly become “borderless” due to globalization, technological communication and accelerated migration or diaspora (i.e. scattering or dispersion of people from their homeland), towards the end of the Second Millennium.  These diasporas have created tremendous opportunities and challenges to evangelize and disciple millions of people who, just a century ago, were living in isolated countries and regions of the world described by missiologists as “closed” and “restricted” to Christian missions.  Thus, the 21st Century reality of mass movements of people requires the global Church, here after referred to as the “Whole Church”, to respond.
Diaspora is then, one of the global issues to be discussed during the upcoming Lausanne III or the Third Lausanne Congress on World Evangelization (Cape Town 2010) gathering of Evangelical leaders in Cape Town, South Africa, October 16-25, 2010.  It must be noted that the previous Lausanne Congresses (Lausanne I – 1974; Lausanne II – 1989) did not address the issue of diasporas.
To prepare for this upcoming discussion (on Diasporas in Cape Town), two consultations on Lausanne Diasporas were convened in 2009 as part of the “road map” to Cape Town. More here