Condos and Clouds

This is arguably one of the most useful presentations I’ve seen and can recommend. Note: Rated MA for language

Condos and Clouds – A LinkedIn Tech Talk by Pat Helland, Distributed Systems and Databases Architect [this description from the LinkedIn event page]

Over the last 100+ years, the way people design, build, and use buildings has evolved. It is now normal to construct a building without knowing in advance who will occupy the building. In addition, we increasingly have shared occupancy of our homes (apartments and condos), retail, and office space. To accomplish this change, the way we use the buildings has evolved. There is a new trust relationship, customs, and laws that establish the relationship between the occupants and the building managers. Recently, our industry has been moving to implement Cloud Computing. This has been very successful in some applications and very challenging in others. This talk posits that many of the challenges we’ve seen in cloud computing can be understood by looking at what has happened in buildings and their occupancy. Standardization, usage patterns, legal establishment of rights and responsibilities are all nascent in the area of cloud computing. We examine a very common pattern in the implementation of “software and a service” and propose ways in which this pattern may be better supported in a multi-tenant fashion.

Biography: Pat Helland has been working in distributed systems, transaction processing, databases, and similar areas since 1978. For most of the 1980s, he was the chief architect of Tandem Computers’ TMF (Transaction Monitoring Facility), which provided distributed transactions for the NonStop System. With the exception of a two-year stint at Amazon, Helland has worked at Microsoft Corporation since 1994 where he was the architect for Microsoft Transaction Server and SQL Service Broker. Until September, 2011, he was working on Cosmos, a distributed computation and storage system that provides back-end support for Bing. Pat recently relocated to San Francisco with his wife to be close to the grandchildren and to explore new opportunities in “Big Data” and/or “Cloud Computing”.