Carroll Ellis Symposium — America’s Greatest Revival: Cane Ridge Reconsidered

Description Link:
https://www.lipscomb.edu/events/carroll-ellis-symposium
Audio Files:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1hgKFTU7zaG5P8gQPZpyX0pQErnDhz26K

“…a fast-moving look at the greatest revival in American history and an event central to the DNA of Churches of Christ. Four eminent restoration scholars are coming together to present nine 18-minute messages spotlighting the roots and great themes behind this remarkable moment in American history.”

Speakers:

Leonard Allen, Lipscomb College of Bible & Ministry Dean
John Mark Hicks, Lipscomb Professor of Bible
Richard Hughes, Lipscomb Scholar-in-Residence
James Gorman, Associate Professor of History at Johnson University

Presentations:

The Second Great Awakening (Gorman)
Barton Stone: His Role in the Revival (Hughes)
Cane Ridge: What Really Happened There? (Gorman)
Exploring Cane Ridge: Communion Festival (Hicks)
Exploring Cane Ridge: Racial Diversity and Slavery (Hughes)
Exploring Cane Ridge: Women as Exhorters (Gorman)
Reconsidering Cane Ridge: Was Cane Ridge America’s Pentecost? (Allen)
Reconsidering Cane Ridge: Revivalism, Spirit, and Unity (Hicks)
Reconsidering Cane Ridge: Loss of Trajectory in Restoration Movement (Allen)

Of related interest:

Edward J. Robinson: Fighting for the pure gospel

Stone-Campbell: Recommended resources

Mission Journal Oral History Interview by Greg McKinzie

Abstract

Greg McKinzie conducted an interview-style session at the 2017 Christian Scholars’ Conference, Lipscomb University, Nashville, TN, dedicated to recording the stories of Dwain Evans, Vic Hunter, and Richard Hughes in the production of Mission Journal. Participants reflected on the motivations, hardships, and successes of publishing thoughtful, courageous content during a tumultuous time for the country and for Churches of Christ. What were the personal costs? How did the journal evolve and why? What would they do differently if they had it to do over? And what is the legacy of Mission for today?

Recommended Citation

McKinzie, Greg (2017) “Mission Journal Oral History Interview,” Mission: Vol. 0 : Iss. 0 , Article 1.
Available at: https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/missionjournal/vol0/iss0/1

Amy Jimenez: The Impact of the Pentecostalism on the Stone Campbell Movement and on the Understanding of the Holy Spirit within Churches of Christ

James W. Garrett: The Role of the Holy Spirit in the New Testament Church
A survey of New Testament references to the Holy Spirit with a view toward understanding His ongoing role in the Church and the lives of individual believers

The Tennessee Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

Monday, January 7, 2019 at 6 pm. American Baptist College 1800 Baptist World Center Dr, Nashville, Tennessee 37207 || https://www.facebook.com/events/958696150983355/

The Tennessee Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival has organized representatives of the poor and directly affected from across the state to testify at the Poor People’s Hearing at American Baptist College in Nashville on Monday, January 7, 2019 at 6 pm. This is the evening before the 2019 session of the Tennessee legislature convenes.

This is a moment in which our legislators, elected officials and the people in power across the state most need to hear the voices of the directly affected and the moral authority of faith leaders in addressing the grievous sins of systemic racism, poverty, the war economy and ecological devastation. We have invited our state legislators and national Congressional representatives, as well as mayors and officials from cities and counties across Tennessee.

We are inviting the powerful — not to speak for us — but to listen. We are inviting those in power to listen to those who have traditionally been left out of the electoral and governing processes in this country. Tennessee’s elected officials will learn about the power of a new and unsettling force that is organizing across this country, and they will hear our demands!

Forward together, not one step back! #Tennessee #PoorPeoplesCampaign

Van Rheenen Thoughts on Church Growth Movement

@litabny: Gailyn Van Rheenen sees Biblical Theology as NOT forming the basic questions of Church Growth research.*

@GailynVanRheen: No, you have not rightly read me! In Missions: Biblical Foundations and Contemporary Strategies (Zondervan, 2016), I provide what I call the Missional Helix in which I show a move from Theology to Strategy Formation within the context of Cultural Analysis/Historical Perspective

This process is done within the context of Spiritual Formation.

The beginning point of ministry is Theological Formation and intertwined throughout the process of Spiritual Discernment.

Ch. 1 is “The Biblical Narrative of Mission: Entering God’s Story,” Ch. 2 “Spiritual Awakenings for Mission.” Ch. 3 “Theological Foundations of Missions,” Ch. 4 “The Church: The Embodiment of Missions.”

My problem with the Church Growth Movement is the primary focus on “growth” rather than disciple-making reflecting the ministries of Jesus and Paul leading to theologically formed disciples who by their passion and God-focus can only speak for God!

* thread

Placeholder | Reconstructing the Gospel Review

Reconstructing the Gospel – Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion by Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove Foreword by The Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II

At Google Books

At a library

5 minute MP3 audio book preview

Every book reviewer lives in a context.

Mine is peppered with influences:

ADRIS Newsletter back in the day (Thank you, David Moberg).

Gailyn Van Rheenen (et. al. from ACU and some professors from FHU) Van Rheenen Thoughts on Church Growth Movement.

Global Church, localized manifestations / incarnations through this lens.

I’m a long-time fanboy of OMSC. Was looking at Thomas John Hastings, What Is This New Thing God Is Doing? in International Bulletin of Mission Research

Saw this in their audio lecture archives this a.m.
Faith and Life: Theological Formation off the Grid – Ruth Padilla DeBorst

While Thomas John Hastings didn’t mention the Spirit’s current emphasis on bi-vocational missioning (Clergy perks, y’all #500thAnniversaryProtestantReformation), Ruth Padilla DeBorst did.

Cybermissiology in global “interdenominational” (church universal / global beloved community / ekklesia)

Also seen recently The Archbishop Romero Trust 

Stephen R. Haynes: The battle for Bonhoeffer

Martin Luther King: Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

John Pavlovitz: The Sins of Christians Choosing The Economy Over Morality

Max Keiser interviews Dr. Michael Hudson re: “…and forgive them their debts: Lending, Foreclosure and Redemption — From Bronze Age Finance to the Jubilee Year.” #PoorPeoplesCampaign

Eric Toussaint: Debt Cancellation in Mesopotamia and Egypt from 3000 to 1000 BC

Michael Hudson: The Land Belongs to God

The Benefits of Debt Relief December 19, 2013