Scott Gordon, Vaco, Opens Dialogue on Candidate Experience

His Facebook page dedicated to this discussion.

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My (edited) comments:

Bill Butler was posting the official economic government stats over on Facebook.

J Tod Fetherling responded: I wouldn’t give credit to any politician because then you have to take credit for the other side of the coin. The 102M not working. This is the scariest number and one we should all be discussing. 60% of the population is working to take care of the 40% not working. This ratio has grown dramatically in the past 8 years to an all time high. At the root is poverty, education, and more jobs in parts of the city where employers don’t want to be. https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t01.htm

I responded to a comment J Tod Fetherling made:

Thanks so much for mentioning the unmentionable #realeconomick stats. Jim Clifton (Gallup) has been posting over at See: U.S. Economy: No Recovery, December 6, 2016 and The Invisible American, September 20, 2016 and Prof Richard Wolff (http://www.democracyatwork.info/) has been youtubeing some of his  recent talks. We have some structural challenges that no politician expecting financial support is going to explore openly. (Note: I like to triangulate between my truth between “cronie” capitalists and my socialists.) I think Wolff’s assertion that folks who are employed are likely to self-censor because they fear losing employment (at the same time all the management books say employees aren’t engaged and manager/leaders need to engage them).

Remember Ross Perot predicted $6 hourly wage post NAFTA and Richard Duncan points out the global wage rate is $10 a day. CEO compensation vs. employee approximately 400x (nationally).

Scott Gordon is trying to explore candidate experiences in Nashville #transparency

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Thoughts…

Kim Bartkus, Executive Director at HR Open Standards Consortium would be interested in the Application Tracking System disconnects.

No Glassdoor recording of firms which post job descriptions which are not intended to be filled #Accountability #HR

#transparency around credit checks, blacklists, local employer anti-poaching / wage rate fixing schemes

#ageism stats for Nashville go uncollected on purpose / for a reason

Why doesn’t Nashville CABLE have a LinkedIn group for member networking? #gatekeeping

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Capacity Utilization https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TCU

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Bryan Ansley: The problem is low wage jobs are 2/3rds of the ones created and 1/3 of middle class wage jobs lost have not been regained and 1/3 of higher wage jobs lost have not been regained. We have a record number of people below the poverty line and a record number of billionaires and the national debt has doubled and the Cold War has restarted and the Middle East is more unstable than I have seen it in decades. Not sure who to blame or give credit to for all this but sugar coated single stat pictures out of context don’t help us find truth.

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Tod Fetherling provided these links

JTF: Ratio of Working to Not Working 2006 1.94 Now 1.677.

America at War with Itself

Henry Giroux, author of forthcoming book, America at War with Itself, chats with Max Keiser. **** fair warning **** Max is a bit of an acquired taste if you are not familiar with his gonzo political science theater 3000 approach to realeconomick and realpolitick.

Keiser Report: America at War with Itself (E928)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYHPUpKFHNk

Keiser Report: Reagan’s warning (E929)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mIBoopBB_U

I agree with Henry’s general theme that institutional education is not placing an emphasis on what I would refer to as the classical liberal arts ability to turn information into knowledge (or apply it, wisdom). In fact, it’s very purpose is to produce neofeudal serfs (thanks, Max).

Yet, there is at the same time, a trend which goes unreported in the Main Stream Media re: the gigabit enablement of libraries (third spaces and repositories of historical materials), global collaboration of national research and education networks (NRENs) linking higher education institutions and other interested parties, efforts like US Ignite, Intelligent Community Forum and the home schooling collaborative curriculum alternatives that go unmentioned (Curriki, Steve Hargadon’s work, Khan Academy, MOOCs, Video archives [C-SPAN, for example and increasingly State libraries], Internet Archives, Wikibooks, LibriVox, Wikipedia, etc.). It is my personal hope that congregations and denominations will shift their real estate to meet the needs of their communities by becoming these gigabit enabled third spaces for community building and co-working (many are already on that journey but these things take time). Tutoring via Google Plus Hangouts and other similar technologies is on the rise and it is global in nature.

While Max’s show is hosted on RT, the growth of internet-based independent investigative media #disintermedia is only going to be speeded by the adoption of crypto and digital currencies (fostering easier crowd funding of reporters and investigations).

A BOTTLENECK: What is lacking is the ability of standard HR departments to assess new kinds of credentialing which arise out of these life long learning models. The reality that global corporate executives can make more money gambling in the derivatives market than in producing actual products which require workers to manufacture is one of Max’s hypotheses that I think deserves much more academic discussion.

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RE: realtheologick: Gary Holloway’s Daily Disciple for today has this encouragement:

There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near. Luke 21:25-28

Should Jesus tarry in his return, the World Convention web site has a pointer to the June 2016 Christian Standard which touches on a couple of the topics mentioned above.

Ecclesiastical Rural Results Only Work Environments

John Hagel and John Seely Brown’s work re: innovation clusters, and their draw of the populace to them, is spot on; to my way of thinking, there is also a countervailing force now occurring1. As fast-enough broadband2 has proliferated both in the US3 and globally4 5 to smaller towns, they have been rewriting their core narratives6. I will be interested in seeing how small town congregations re-envision themselves, especially in light of the nexus of eldercare and this7.

  1. Brain gain in rural Minnesota
  2. What Kind Of Speed Matters for Broadband’s Economic Development Impact? – Strategic Network Group
  3. Community Network Map – Institute for Local Self-Reliance
  4. Animated map reveals the 550,000 miles of cable hidden under the ocean that power the internet – Business Insider
  5. Broadband for the Rural North #B4RN
  6. Toward a new narrative: How the Center for Small Towns crafts a different rural story
  7. The US uncompensated volunteerism industry

The US uncompensated volunteerism industry

The US for profit healthcare industry rests upon a vast ocean of uncompensated volunteerism:

Heavy toll endured by ‘invisible’ unpaid caregivers. A study published yesterday in the JAMA Network medical journal seems to state the obvious. Family members and friends who step up to help elderly or disabled adults sacrifice their own well-being.
http://www.digitaljournal.com/life/health/study-heavy-toll-endured-by-invisible-unpaid-caregivers/article/457833#ixzz40dcL57oC

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In 2009, about 42.1 million family caregivers in the United States provided care to an adult with limitations in daily activities at any given point in time, and about 61.6 million provided care at some time during the year. The estimated economic value of their unpaid contributions was approximately $450 billion in 2009, up from an estimated $375 billion in 2007.

Valuing the Invaluable: 2011 Update
The Growing Contributions and Costs of Family Caregiving
Lynn Feinberg, Susan C. Reinhard, Ari Houser, and Rita Choula
AARP Public Policy Institute

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Family caregivers in the U.S. spend an estimated 30 billion hours per year caring for older family and friends. That’s about $522 billion in care, according to a new Rand Corp. study, as measured by valuing the time caregivers have sacrificed in order to be able to provide care. – See more at: http://states.aarp.org/family-caregivers-provide-522-billion-in-uncompensated-care-per-year/#sthash.DUlY2pNi.dpuf

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Latest Estimated Value of Volunteer Time via Independent Sector

National Value of Volunteer Time: $23.07 per hour

The estimate helps acknowledge the millions of individuals who dedicate their time, talents, and energy to making a difference. Charitable organizations can use this estimate to quantify the enormous value volunteers provide.

According to the Corporation for National and Community Service, about 62.6 million Americans, or 25.4 percent of the adult population, gave 7.7 billion hours of volunteer service worth $173 billion in 2013.2 For the latest information, please see www.volunteeringinamerica.gov.
https://www.independentsector.org/volunteer_time

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VOLUNTEERING IN THE UNITED STATES — 2014

The volunteer rate was little changed at 25.3 percent for the year ending in September 2014, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. About 62.8 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2013 and September 2014. The volunteer rate in 2013 was 25.4 percent.
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.nr0.htm

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TIME BANKING

In economics, a time-based currency is an alternative currency or exchange system where the unit of account/value is the person-hour or some other time unit. Some time-based currencies value everyone’s contributions equally: one hour equals one service credit. In these systems, one person volunteers to work for an hour for another person; thus, they are credited with one hour, which they can redeem for an hour of service from another volunteer. Others use time units that might be fractions of an hour (e.g. minutes, ten minutes – 6 units/hour, or 15 minutes – 4 units/hour). While most time-based exchange systems are service exchanges in that most exchange involves the provision of services that can be measured in a time unit, it is also possible to exchange goods by ‘pricing’ them in terms of the average national hourly wage rate (e.g. if the average hourly rate is $20/hour, then a commodity valued at $20 in the national currency would be equivalent to 1 hour).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time-based_currency