Joseph Malgeri is looking for some stories about the lack of internet

Joseph Malgeri posted the following in the Facebook Public Group “Internet Seekers: Citizens Striving for Fiber in TN”:

YOUR ATTENTION PLEASE! I’m looking for some stories about how the lack of internet is impacting your and your family’s lives. They don’t have to be long but they should be clear and complete. Post them here or email them to fibreopticconsultant@gmail.com. Thanks in advance for your help.

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ATTENTION READERS. Please note message at the end.

I wonder if they get it…

I wonder if our elected officials realize the damage they do to their state, in so many ways:

Lawmakers know how much high speed internet is needed across the state, yet they continue to block efforts to expand it, even when it will cost taxpayers nothing.

I wonder how many of our citizens realize that the governor’s initiative, the recently passed Broadband Accessibility Act is mostly smoke and mirrors; that the $45 million he budgeted over three years will barely cover 200 miles – when we can cover the state for free. How many people realize that the way the law is structured, the definition of high-speed is like legislating rotary phones for all?

Since 2004, when some select communities took up the challenge to bring broadband to their areas. Even though they were limited by laws authored by AT&T, some 350,000 residents and almost 13,000 businesses have taken high speed internet, while millions of Tennesseans, both urban and rural have been denied access.

In the face of overwhelming evidence that these brave communities have prospered while others have wilted;

In the face of compelling evidence that a lack of access to high speed internet drives existing businesses away and causes prospective new businesses to look elsewhere;

In view of the facts that young innovators are swarming to connected communities where opportunities are aplenty while our young people around the state leave home for opportunities they cannot find locally; and,

In view of the fact that the municipal electric utilities providing internet in those connected communities pay millions of dollars per year combined in Payments in Lieu of Taxes to their respective communities’ general funds;

In view of all the good going on around us, don’t you think it’s high time to oust legislators who openly deny our rights to have what they have.

Don’t continue to re-elect lawmakers who hide behind false concepts about free markets when what they’re really doing is protecting their donor’s turf.

I wonder, dear readers, if…. if, over the Thanksgiving break you will think about the successes mounting in connected cities and ask, why not us?

I wonder, politicians across the state, how you can stand in the way of your constituents’ rights to self determination – and then ask for their votes in November.

Are you getting this, Beth Harwell?

Dear Readers,
I’ve been working on this for years now. I know how important this issue is for all of us but mostly you. My time here is limited while yours may be decades longer. I am eager to take this message across the state, NOW, so we can shake up the 2018 election and get the bills passes that free us to take charge of our own destinies.
I want your help. Set up town halls and interviews in your back yards and I’ll be there. Make video and Podcasts, and I’ll share the truth that you can then speak to power.
I’ve got the roadmaps, all we need now are the road warriors.
Thank you for reading. Happy Thanksgiving. JM

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Here are some related resources:

Connected Nashville 2 (October 12, 2017)

Connected Nashville: A Vision for a Smarter City (May 11, 2016)

Washington Journal Phil Bredesen Discusses Health Care Policy Tennessee

Washington Journal Governor Bill Haslam Discusses Priorities Tennessee

From Craig Settles:

Telehealth is extremely popular in healthcare, particularly in low-income urban and rural areas. However, without quality broadband high-speed Internet access telehealth doesn’t happen.

My latest report makes a business case for using community broadband to advance healthcare because that’s how we drive both broadband and telehealth adoption. Telehealth users and vendors, community broadband owners, and local broadband providers share compelling interests and benefits.

Using real-world cases, this report lays out a strategy for boosting telemedicine and broadband adoption. Uniting healthcare providers, schools and libraries in healthcare hubs has fundraising, infrastructure development and political advantages your community should evaluate.

The FCC majority, some members in Congress and a number of state legislators are not our friends. If you want highspeed Internet access, it falls squarely on communities’ collective shoulders!

Community Broadband Snapshot Report ™ November 2017

Scott Gordon, Vaco, Opens Dialogue on Candidate Experience

His Facebook page dedicated to this discussion.

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My (edited) comments:

Bill Butler was posting the official economic government stats over on Facebook.

J Tod Fetherling responded: I wouldn’t give credit to any politician because then you have to take credit for the other side of the coin. The 102M not working. This is the scariest number and one we should all be discussing. 60% of the population is working to take care of the 40% not working. This ratio has grown dramatically in the past 8 years to an all time high. At the root is poverty, education, and more jobs in parts of the city where employers don’t want to be. https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t01.htm

I responded to a comment J Tod Fetherling made:

Thanks so much for mentioning the unmentionable #realeconomick stats. Jim Clifton (Gallup) has been posting over at See: U.S. Economy: No Recovery, December 6, 2016 and The Invisible American, September 20, 2016 and Prof Richard Wolff (http://www.democracyatwork.info/) has been youtubeing some of his  recent talks. We have some structural challenges that no politician expecting financial support is going to explore openly. (Note: I like to triangulate between my truth between “cronie” capitalists and my socialists.) I think Wolff’s assertion that folks who are employed are likely to self-censor because they fear losing employment (at the same time all the management books say employees aren’t engaged and manager/leaders need to engage them).

Remember Ross Perot predicted $6 hourly wage post NAFTA and Richard Duncan points out the global wage rate is $10 a day. CEO compensation vs. employee approximately 400x (nationally).

Scott Gordon is trying to explore candidate experiences in Nashville #transparency

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Thoughts…

Kim Bartkus, Executive Director at HR Open Standards Consortium would be interested in the Application Tracking System disconnects.

No Glassdoor recording of firms which post job descriptions which are not intended to be filled #Accountability #HR

#transparency around credit checks, blacklists, local employer anti-poaching / wage rate fixing schemes

#ageism stats for Nashville go uncollected on purpose / for a reason

Why doesn’t Nashville CABLE have a LinkedIn group for member networking? #gatekeeping

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Capacity Utilization https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TCU

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Bryan Ansley: The problem is low wage jobs are 2/3rds of the ones created and 1/3 of middle class wage jobs lost have not been regained and 1/3 of higher wage jobs lost have not been regained. We have a record number of people below the poverty line and a record number of billionaires and the national debt has doubled and the Cold War has restarted and the Middle East is more unstable than I have seen it in decades. Not sure who to blame or give credit to for all this but sugar coated single stat pictures out of context don’t help us find truth.

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Tod Fetherling provided these links

JTF: Ratio of Working to Not Working 2006 1.94 Now 1.677.

Profits vs Prophets

In case you missed it: the point of the election was the recognition that we, as a nation, are failing at the equitable distribution of compensation for work (“profit”). The obsessive (demonic) need of C-Suites to aggregate (purposeless) money is called “greed”. The worker’s unwillingness to put personal capital at risk for the corporate good (“skin in the game”, investing) is also called “greed”.

“Prophets” call for the just distribution of compensation for work; this is known as “righteousness”. (They also call for the protection of the vulnerable).

In the beginnings of the early churches, greed, one of the opposites of righteousness, was a challenge:

Now listen, you rich people, weep and wail because of the misery that is coming on you. Your wealth has rotted, and moths have eaten your clothes. Your gold and silver are corroded. Their corrosion will testify against you and eat your flesh like fire. You have hoarded wealth in the last days. Look! The wages you failed to pay the workers who mowed your fields are crying out against you. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord Almighty. You have lived on earth in luxury and self-indulgence. You have fattened yourselves in the day of slaughter. You have condemned and murdered the innocent one, who was not opposing you. James 5:1-6 NIVUK

Jesus taught and warned that we cannot serve two masters; we can either serve God (which he said we express by loving one another) or we can serve Mammon (the obsessive accumulation of power and stuff to a degree harmful to humanity, our “sisters” and “brothers”).

James noted that our Mammon worship, unchecked, eventually leads to war (collective use of violence to gather booty).

James knew we do not like to admit the shame and guilt we feel when collect wealth at the expense of others — and so we do not pray to God for our needs. We know if we pray, his Holy Spirit will convict our hearts that our ways need to change in the direction of generosity toward one another.

From time to time we need to reflect on how our actions (and our inactions) harm one another. This is called “mourning our sins”. It is often accomplished by a setting a special time to reflect (often collectively as a group or in groups). This is referred to as a “fast” or “a day of mourning”.

During such a time, we review the compassionate actions of God toward us in the past, we admit if we have failed to be grateful, and we purpose to do better in the future. This is called “repentance”.

Harsh reality #1: not everyone wants to repent.

Harsh reality #2: worshiping Mammon isn’t just a mental decision to be indifferent toward humanity; it is the first step toward the destruction of humanity (more on that later; see also, yes, Virginia, there is an Adversary). There are those who choose to be filled with the Unholy Spirit, the “perfectly possessed”. The perfectly possessed often rise into positions of power. They are not out for humanity’s good. To check this danger, Paul of Tarsus wrote:

I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people – for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. This is good, and pleases God our Saviour, who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth. 1 Timothy 2:1-4

Paul’s advise is neither capricious nor superfluous. Leaders and followers of every type need spiritual assistance. This includes global corporate c-suites, the leadership councils of worker collectives, the heads of family businesses, those in government positions of responsibility and bureaucracy, etc.

When we pray for one another, we fulfill a role called “priest” (intercessor [standing in the gap]). When we encourage one another toward acting authentically and compassionately, we fulfill a role called “prophet”.

Harsh reality #3: Not every nation appreciates priests and prophets.

Harsh reality #4: No nation lasts forever.

Question: For whom are you praying today?

Suggested prayer: Heavenly Father, please reveal to us knowledge and insights into generosity. May we see it in your daily actions toward us (your steadfast lovingkindness), those of your King (Yeshua of Nazareth) during his days of earthly ministry, and those of the Holy Spirit working among those who seek to obediently trust you, both individually and in congregations and their alliances. May we discern that many we meet learned their behaviors during childhoods filled with trauma and hatred and that those scars run very deep and our society refuses to acknowledge them. Help us to grant each other mercy and the benefit of the doubt – remembering that we are all “playing hurt” – and that if we are still alive – you are not finished conforming us to the image of your Beloved Son, Yeshua. In whose name we pray.

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I appreciate when #realtheologick and #realeconomick occur. I saw this presentation after writing the above post.

A Moral Challenge to Economists, New Economic Thinking, Streamed live on Nov 11, 2016

In his keynote address to our economics of race conference in Detroit last week, Rev. Dr. William Barber II issued a blistering critique of structural inequality in the United States, and urged economists to recognize their responsibility to the poor.

@RevDrBarber @BRepairers

GLORIAD News

Update: Insight Application

Greg Cole, Director, Center for International Networking Initiatives, The University of Tennessee, the Principal Investigator and Director, GLORIAD, passed these links along about the Global Ring Network for Advanced Applications Development:

Overview Movie: .mov (214 MB, download first, then play)

Former NSF Director, Subra Suresh speech re: GLORIAD Egypt launch: .mp4 (205 MB)

Former NSF Director, Subra Suresh talk re: GLORIAD and other efforts in India: .mp4 (39 MB)

AMCOST New GLORIAD Egypt/Africa effort: .mov .m4v Desktop Provides overview shots of the Africa Union Ministerial Meeting for Science and Technology, from March 7-10, 2010

GLORIAD/Tata Movie: Youtube

UT-produced Video re: GLORIAD: Youtube Greg Cole comments on GLORIAD’s role and potential

US NSF Press Release (Taj)

US State Dept Article

UT Quest Article

US NSF Press Release

GLORIAD dvNOC “click on GLORIAD-EARTH” tab to see live display of science applications using the network (updated every 10-15 seconds):

Recent GLORIAD newsletter from recent trip to India: (pdf)

Recent GLORIAD presentations

Zeeba, the Social Network Connecting the World of Science and Cyberinfrastructure

PlayPlay

US Ignite Tutorial on CloudLab.US

I’m reviewing the US Ignite Tutorial on CloudLab.US, featuring an OpenStack Juno on Ubuntu 14.10 instance with a controller, network manager, and one compute node. This profile runs on either x86 or ARM64 nodes. It takes advantage of Vanilla Apache Hadoop, Hortonworks Data Platform, Apache Spark, etc.

CloudLab is a leading-edge laboratory for exploring and applying new computer cloud architectures at scale. The CloudLab infrastructure consists of three new clusters at U. Wisconsin, Clemson U., and U. Utah augmenting the existing Emulab and GENI (Global Environment for Network Innovations) distributed computing facilities. Each of the new clusters is aimed at providing hardware support for a different point in the cloud design space, and together they represent an extraordinary flexibility for computer scientists to try new ideas and for domain scientists to match CloudLab infrastructure to their applications.

CloudLab is a project of the University of Utah, Clemson University, the University of Wisconsin Madison, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Raytheon BBN Technologies, and US Ignite. CloudLab is part of the National Science Foundation’s NSFCloud program. To design and build the CloudLab facility, we’re partnering with three vendors: Cisco, Dell, and HP. Seagate has also provided a generous donation of hard drives.

Another similar project is Chameleon. Some videos here.

UPDATE: see also this additional recently announced project: Cornell to Lead NSF-Funded Cloud Federation for Big Data Analysis By David Raths 11/04/15

Some Thoughts

A: The Tower of Babylon

Gen. 11 At one time the whole earth had the same language and vocabulary.[a] 2 As people[b] migrated from the east,[c] they found a valley in the land of Shinar and settled there. 3 They said to each other, “Come, let us make oven-fired bricks.” They used brick for stone and asphalt for mortar. 4 And they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city and a tower with its top in the sky. Let us make a name for ourselves; otherwise, we will be scattered over the face of the whole earth.” 5 Then the Lord came down to look over the city and the tower that the men were building. 6 The Lord said, “If they have begun to do this as one people all having the same language, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. 7 Come, let Us go down there and confuse[d] their language[e] so that they will not understand one another’s speech.”[f] 8 So from there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth, and they stopped building the city. 9 Therefore its name is called Babylon,[g] for there the Lord confused the language of the whole earth, and from there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.

B: The Times of the Ethnes

Acts 17: 26 From one man[f] He has made every nationality to live over the whole earth and has determined their appointed times and the boundaries of where they live. 27 He did this so they might seek God, and perhaps they might reach out and find Him, though He is not far from each one of us.

C: Pioneer Bible Translators

http://pioneerbible.org/

D: Ontologies, Taxonomies, Knowledge Management

Protégé – http://protege.stanford.edu/

Protégé Team – http://protege.stanford.edu/about.php

Tennessee Big Data Science

Tackling Big Genomics Data meetings.internet2.edu/2014-global-summit/detail/10003140/

Data Logistics Toolkit (DLT) [Indiana University; University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Vanderbilt University] http://www.data-logistics.org/?q=about @NSF Grant Number OCI‐1246282

Two UT Researchers Win Fifth Annual IDEA Awards

http://tntoday.utk.edu/2010/05/11/ut-researchers-win-idea-awards/

2010 Internet2 Driving Exemplary Applications (IDEA) Award for their work in developing a network storage infrastructure that will aid the nation’s researchers and educators in transferring large amounts of data and research quickly and easily for collaboration.

REDDnet: Enabling Data Intensive Science in the Wide Area www.reddnet.org/mwiki/index.php/Main_Page

 

Update: (ht Ben White via Facebook)
40 maps that explain the internet
www.vox.com/a/internet-maps

Internet2 Sessions

08:45 AM
10:30 AM
01:15 PM

Monday General Session: Global Innovation

Sponsored by Juniper Networks
Netcast sponsored by 2014 GS – Cisco

ROOM: Plaza Ballroom A/B/CSPEAKERS: Patrick BurnsAnthony Frank

01:15 PM- 02:30 PM

Keynote Speaker: Chris Vein

Chris Vein leads the implementation of the World Bank’s ICT strategy, ICT policy and engagement dialogue with internal and external clients, and global ICT knowledge and expertise sharing with client countries. Prior to joining the World Bank, Vein was the Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer for Government Innovation in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he focused on making government more open, entrepreneurial, and lean; creating new and innovative opportunities for delivering government products, services and processes; and incubating innovation capacity in the civic, technology and civic society arenas.

Over the past two decades, Chris Vein has had the honor of serving four U.S. Presidents, thousands of professional association practitioners around the world, for-profit consulting organizations, and local government organizations. Learn more about the World Bank’s Chris Vein at http://www.govtech.com/e-government/Chris-Vein-Leaves-White-House-for-the-World-Bank.html.

Photo courtesy of the World Bank.

03:00 PM
04:30 PM
08:45 AM
10:30 AM

Tuesday General Session: Future of the University

Sponsored by 2014 GS – Microsoft
Netcast sponsored by 2014 GS – Cisco

ROOM: Plaza Ballroom A/B/CSPEAKERS: H. David LambertPhilip DiStefanoMichael McRobbieLarry Levine

10:30 AM- 11:45 AM

Keynote Speaker: Shirley Ann Jackson

The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D., is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, and Hartford, Connecticut, the oldest technological research university in the United States. With a focus on Rensselaer as a top-tier technological research university with global reach and global impact, her tenure has been marked by a successful $1.4 billion capital campaign, the hiring of over 300 new faculty, a tripling of research awards and a tripling of applications to the freshman class, the construction of state-of-the art research platforms, and innovations both in the curriculum and student life. Dr. Jackson is a director of several major corporations, including FedEx and IBM. She serves on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), the White House Advanced Manufacturing Partnership Steering Committee 2.0, the U.S. Secretary of State’s International Security Advisory Board, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Secretary of Energy Advisory Board.

01:15 PM
03:00 PM
04:30 PM
08:45 AM
10:30 AM
10:30 AM- 11:45 AM

Keynote Speaker: Larry Peterson

01:15 PM
03:00 PM
04:30 PM
08:45 AM
10:30 AM

My Response to Milt’s Tweet

Milt Capps ‏@miltcapps Venture validation? #Nashville #startups & Tech talent so good they get bought and move elsewhere – natural, but not what we’re hoping for.

My response:

My major fear for a gigified Nashville (ATT, Google, Comcast, NES, whomever) is that managers|C-suites will not learn that geography doesn’t always have to matter. I feel|think that the telephonification of rural America could provide an apt parable. If we bring communication to the farm, that does not equate with the adoption of the technology. If farmer Brown insists on continuing to drive into the General Store to get his real time information then much of the value of the telephone is lost.

The European Enlightenment is another good case study. Tho @jhagel and @sgblank have caused me to more greatly appreciate the value of technology clusters (Silicon Valley) and while Michael Faraday needed the facilities of the Royal Society, today’s cloud|software products|services and tech talent often do not need a similar laboratory* (they, of course, often share a similar need for patrons). The Enlightenment spread, in part, by use of the printing press. While the coffee house effect was very important, publication allowed for non-face-to-face communication on a mass scale, for those willing to avail themselves of the opportunity. Here lies my point: just because one European city did not adapt to new technologies quickly, that didn’t mean that others (their “competition”) did not.

Now that we have the entréstructure, and the hope of gigification, it is time for us to put a laser light upon the education|modification of the Nashville legacy management culture’s reticence to adopt tech to its fullest or we are lost; lost, I say! (OK, it will continue to produce sub-optimal results).

*I find the trend of Library|MakerSpaces very intriguing