Technology Affinity Group 2012 Call for Sessions

The Technology Affinity Group (http://www.tagtech.org) is holding its 2012 Annual Conference November 12 – 15, 2012 in Monterey, CA at the Monterey Plaza Hotel and Spa (http://www.montereyplazahotel.com).

The goal of the annual TAG Conference is to serve as an educational learning opportunity for TAG members by providing sessions that are relevant to the needs of the TAG membership. Many members have indicated that they have joined TAG to network and share information and ideas with their peers. This conference is one way for the affinity group to meet member needs.

What makes the conference unique is that it is the one place for technology professionals working in philanthropy to share their experiences with peers. As such, the conference sessions should be about the application of technology relevant to the specific audience niche.

TAG Conference Goals

  • Networking: Provide networking opportunities for TAG members – connecting people with others facing similar issues for information sharing;
  • Community: Build the TAG community – relationships that can be leveraged beyond the conference;
  • Education: Provide practical educational opportunities and professional development for TAG members.

Conference Sessions
The Conference Agenda Committee is planning a keynote, two plenary sessions and twelve breakout sessions. Plenary sessions are allotted 90 minutes; breakout sessions are allotted 60 minutes.

The committee welcomes sessions that are relevant, timely, engaging and valuable.

Below are some ideas the committee identified as areas of interest for potential sessions. Your session does not have to be about one of these topics but we thought the list would provide some initial guidance to you.

Consumerization – how it applies to philanthropy
‘Going paperless’/Streamling the grants management process
Mobility – devices & applications
Business continuity planning
Security

Target Audience
The TAG membership consists of a diverse set of professionals, all responsible for managing the technology function within a philanthropic organization. Although members are generally responsible for technology, they are not necessarily technologists. Members’ job functions vary from senior staff to technical managerial positions such as a chief information officer, chief operations or administrative officer, director of technology or ‘jack-of-all-trades’ manager of technology and technology-specific functions such as a database administrator, web specialist or network administrator to those whose primary skill set is not technology but whose positions are very dependent on technology such as communications professionals, financial managers, grants managers and evaluation staff.

Hands-on training for technical staff on specific technologies is not the focus of this conference. However, we hope and expect more in-depth technical information sharing will happen via peer networking. The conference purpose is to educate and connect members around the application of technology relative to the field.

Session Tracks, Format and Objective
Two tracks have been targeted for this conference: Management and Technical.

Management
Session should be designed to discuss issues around technology management, communications and collaboration. These sessions deal with broader management issues and policies related to the technology function versus the technology itself.

Technical
Session should be devoted to technologies themselves. Despite this focus, these sessions should be targeted to the technology manager/decision maker rather than the engineer responsible for installing and maintaining a particular technology.

Format
A session should be 60 minutes for a breakout session and 90 minutes for a plenary session. At least 20-30 minutes of the session should be devoted to audience participation or a key “activity” for the audience.

Objective
The session topic should be one that provides educational value for your colleagues with technology management responsibilities in the philanthropic field. The session should have broad applicability (large and small organizations, varying skill levels) and clear, specific focus. Consider what result(s) participants can expect from the session. A good session will have changed the participants’ current knowledge and/or skills in some way. Avoid focusing here on process—e.g., “to discuss best practices.” Rather, a real objective should describe a desired outcome.

TAG Conference Call for Sessions
Once you submit a suggestion for a session you will be contacted by the TAG Agenda Committee indicating whether your session has been accepted or not. Even if your session has been accepted, you may be asked by the committee to modify your session to better fit the conference.

Please submit your completed Call for Sessions Form to:
Lisa Pool
lisa @ tagtech.org
No later than Friday, April 13, 2012

What Can Village Telco’s Steve Song Teach US NonProfits and Technology Vendors

or Make me Your Fellow???… anyone…anyone???

Target your assets on measurable results. If you’re a FOUNDATION, develop a FELLOWSHIP program, especially if you’re a technology vendor like Netsuite or Salesforce trying to gain marketshare at the same time you are trying to do social good. Then deploy these FELLOWS into the NPO field (SWAT Teams virtually connected) to help the organization with their integration architecture overview and deployment.

As for politicians, think tankers, pundits, public policy analysts: SHUT UP AND QUIT YOUR WHINING until you can SHOW ME THE MONEY about all of these STEMy job openings for which you just can’t find enough talent in the way Bloomberg Sportfolio explains the business of sport (and the unmentioned business of sports betting). Is there a Fantasy Football League of Geeks and Nerds anywhere? LinkedIn? Oracle Taleo? anyone??? anyone???

Here’s Steve’s story (thanks, Bertil van Vugt).

Association 2.0

<ed.note>O.k., we all know that the real subhead is “And How Planners Can SURVIVE it” but it is interesting to see that the author omits the only real advantage conventions which don’t take place virtually still hold over their non-geo-locked equivalents.</ed.note>

 

How Social Media Is Revolutionizing Community Building – And How Planners Can Manage It

 

By Mickey Murphy, Association Conventions & Facilities, themeetingmagazines.com

During a major conference that her firm was assisting, Julie S. McKown, communications strategist, Fusion Productions, was sitting backstage during a general session of the meeting. On the projection screen, rolling along in real-time, were tweets from attendees in the audience who were listening to the speaker’s remarks.

TAG Call for Sessions Submissions: Harnessing New Trends in Communications and Technology

This is a reminder that the TAG Call for Sessions Submissions are due Monday, April 5th.  If you plan to submit a session design, please send your proposal to lisa@tagtech.org.

Every year in preparation for our annual conference, we send out a call for sessions asking you, the TAG community, for session ideas. One reason why TAG conferences are so successful is because we get such great input from our members.

The theme this year is: Harnessing New Trends in Communications and Technology.

Mobile computing, social media and other online tools are challenging traditional technology and communication models. New cloud services make it easy for foundations of all sizes to leverage new applications. Come learn what software, hardware, policies and management practices foundations are implementing to further their foundation goals.

Attached is a Word document with more information, as well as the proposal form. You need not volunteer to be the presenter to submit an idea. Session proposals are due by April 5. Please e-mail your proposal to lisa@tagtech.org . Thanks!

Michael O’Brien and Kris McDaid

(Chair and co-chair of the TAG 2010 Conference Agenda Committee)

8th Annual Conference

November 8 – 11, 2010

Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa, San Diego, CA

2010 Call for Sessions

The Technology Affinity Group (www.tagtech.org) is holding its 8th annual conference November 8 – 11, 2010 in San Diego, CA at the Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa (http://www.estancialajolla.com).

The goal of the annual TAG Conference is to serve as an educational learning opportunity for TAG members by providing sessions that are relevant to the needs of the TAG membership. Many members have indicated that they have joined TAG to network and share information and ideas with their peers. This conference is one way for the affinity group to meet member needs.

What makes the conference unique is that it is the one place for technology professionals working in philanthropy to share their experiences with peers. As such, the conference sessions should be about the application of technology relevant to the specific audience niche.

TAG Conference Goals

      • Networking: Provide networking opportunities for TAG members – connecting people with others facing similar issues for information sharing;

      • Community: Build the TAG community – relationships that can be leveraged beyond the conference;

      • Education: Provide practical educational opportunities and professional development for TAG members.

Target Audience

The TAG membership consists of a diverse set of professionals, all responsible for managing the technology function within a philanthropic organization. Although members are generally responsible for technology, they are not necessarily technologists. Members’ job functions vary from technology-specific functions such as a database administrator, web specialist or network administrator to technical managerial positions such as a chief information officer, director of technology or ‘jack-of-all-trades’ manager of technology to those whose primary skill set is not technology but whose positions are very dependent on technology such as communications professionals, financial managers. grants managers and evaluation staff.

Hands-on training for technical staff on specific technologies is not the focus of this conference. However, we hope and expect more in-depth technical information sharing will happen via peer networking. The conference purpose is to educate and connect members around the application of technology relative to the field.

Theme

The theme for this year’s conference is Harnessing New Trends in Communications and Technology. Mobile computing, social media and other online tools are challenging traditional technology and communication models.  New cloud services make it easy for foundations of all sizes to leverage new applications.  Come learn what software, hardware, policies and management practices foundations are implementing to further their foundation goals.

Sessions can be on anything that connects to the theme in some way. Below are six ideas the committee identified as areas of interest for potential sessions. Your session does not have to be about one of these topics but we thought the list would provide some initial guidance to you.

  • Mobile applications

  • CRM in the Foundation

  • Dashboards (CRM / Grants Management / etc.)

  • Project management / collaboration

  • Dealing with loss of control in the age of Web 2.0

  • Streamlining foundation operations

Session Tracks

Two tracks have been targeted for this conference: Management/Communication and Technical.

Management/Communication

Session should be designed to discuss issues around technology management, communications and collaboration. These sessions deal with broader management issues related to the technology function versus the technology itself.

Technical

Session should be devoted to technologies themselves. Despite this focus, these sessions should be targeted to the technology manager/decision maker rather than the engineer responsible for installing and maintaining a particular technology.

Please submit completed Call for Sessions Form to:

Lisa Pool

Lisa.pool@verizon.net

No later than Monday, April 5, 2010

8th Annual Conference

November 8 – 11, 2010

Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa, San Diego, CA

2010 Call for Sessions

Session Designer

Name

Professional Title

Organization

E-Mail

Principal Affiliation

(staff, consultant, etc.)

Address

Phone

If there are any “co-designers,” please list no more than two individuals, their professional titles and principal affiliations here:

Co-designer Information

Name

Professional Title

Organization

E-Mail

Principal Affiliation

(staff, consultant, etc.)

Address

Phone

Session Category

Indicate the category for the session by double clicking (or right click) on the box and updating the default value to “Checked”.

Management/Communications Technical

Session Title (80 characters maximum, including spaces):

Session Description

Please write a concise, action-oriented description that provides important facts and generates excitement about your session. As you write, focus on your primary session objective and let potential participants know what you expect will happen as a result of the session. Be specific, but also focus on “what” (issues and outcome) rather than “who” (speakers). NOTE: This description will be used for promotional purposes, including the conference electronic brochure and/or other information (the co-chairs reserve the right to edit descriptions as necessary). Once you are satisfied with the description, consider whether your session title conveys the essence of what you have written. Please limit your description to 75 words.

Session Objective & Fit

The committee requests that session designers concentrate on the educational value of conference sessions for their colleagues with technology management responsibilities in the philanthropic field. As a session designer, your guiding principles should have broad applicability (large and small organizations, varying skill levels) and clear, specific focus. With respect to the second principle, think of the primary session objective, and supporting objectives, in terms of what result(s) participants can expect from the session. A good session will have changed the participants’ current knowledge and/or skills in some way. Avoid focusing here on process—e.g., “to discuss best practices.” Rather, a real objective should describe a desired outcome. Please identify one short, clear objective and no more than three supporting objectives.

Note on “Fit”: Keep in mind that the primary objective must be appropriate for—i.e., will “fit into”—a 75 to 90 minute session, with the understanding that at least 20 to 30 minutes are to be devoted to audience participation or a key “activity” for the audience.

As a result of this session, participants will…

Please identify one short, clear objective and no more than three supporting objectives.

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

Supporting Objectives:

Session Need (Issue Areas)

In 1-2 sentences, using 1-3 key words or phrases, please explain the specific needs (or issue areas) that this session will address. (i.e. This Management/Communications session will focus on technology planning with a focus on how organizational communication patterns should drive the plan.)

Session Format

The committee seeks formats that are appropriate for session objectives. It is not necessary for every session to be designed around a “panel discussion” or “talk-show format.” Along with hearing from presenters, participants want to hear what colleagues are doing, test ideas and get feedback from others in the field, which means more than simply a few minutes of questions and answers at the end of a session.

Examples of creative and engaging session formats are small group exercises, case study discussions, problem solving, brainstorming, debates, simulations (role-play), data gathering (surveys) and other activities. For example, a session focused on technology planning could be structured as 60 minutes of small group exercises where participants work through activities and scenarios independently, with 30 minutes of reporting back to the full group. In this scenario, presenters are not needed but rather a skilled facilitator who spends time interacting with the small groups.

For overall conference agenda planning, it is important to indicate the amount of time you anticipate for each section and for your session overall.

Please be specific and creativethe goal is to engage and involve the audience in a key “activity” to meet your primary session objective.

Proposed Session Moderators

Please remember that one of the key reasons members are part of TAG is for peer networking. Limiting the number of presenters to two in addition to the moderator/facilitator helps make sure that there is time for audience participation. Some of the most effective sessions feature just one moderator or facilitator!

Moderator/Facilitator: A skilled session moderator or facilitator is dynamic, energizing and motivating. S/he not only helps plan and organize the session discussion, but also creates and maintains a "safe" learning environment. When selecting this person, please keep in mind her/his ability to encourage and listen to diverse audiences, as you will rely on them to clarify discussion objectives, keep the dialogue on track and succinctly summarize and conclude the session.

This moderator is important to the session because… (e.g., “knows how to keep the agenda moving,” “is not afraid to intervene and enforce time-limits to keep the session on track,” “can summarize effectively,” “can draw people out”)

Name

Professional Title

Organization

E-Mail

Principal Affiliation

(staff, consultant, etc.)

Address

Phone

Presenter 1 (if applicable):

Name

Professional Title

Organization

E-Mail

Principal Affiliation

(staff, consultant, etc.)

Address

Phone

This presenter is important to the session because… (e.g., “is knowledgeable in…,” “provides x or y perspective or can debate on x or y side of the issue,” “is energetic, provocative,” “knows how to spark and maintain a lively discussion”):

Presenter 2 (if applicable):

Name

Professional Title

Organization

E-Mail

Principal Affiliation

(staff, consultant, etc.)

Address

Phone

This presenter is important to the session because… (e.g., “is knowledgeable in…,” “provides x or y perspective or can debate on x or y side of the issue,” “is energetic, provocative,” “knows how to spark and maintain a lively discussion”)

Please submit completed Call for Sessions Form to:

Lisa.pool@verizon.net

No later than Monday, April 5, 2010

2009 Nonprofit Software Development Summit

The 2009 Nonprofit Software Development Summit is just a few weeks away, taking place in Oakland, California. We'd love to have more NOSI energy in the circle!

You can check out the latest session list at

http://devsummit09.aspirationtech.org/index.php/Session_List

We invite your help in spreading the word; please tweet it, blog it, Facebook it to your networks. Hashtag #devsummit, http://bit.ly/2LmoiG

New sessions are being added each week, and we invite you to add a session and share your own nonprofit software development experiences, or to request a session to address your questions about nonprofit software.

Please join us for this year's Dev Summit! Complete details are at

http://www.aspirationtech.org/events/devsummit09

and we still have sliding scale registration slots available.

The 2009 Nonprofit Software Development Summit is generously sponsored by Mozilla, Google, and CiviCRM.

We hope to see you in later this month!

peace,

gunner

– 

Allen Gunn

Executive Director, Aspiration

+1.415.216.7252

http://www.aspirationtech.org

Aspiration: "Better Tools for a Better World"

UCP Executive Director Post to Change.Gov

The inauguration of a new president takes place tomorrow. Like
many Americans, I am proud that our country is an example to the world
of what peaceful and orderly change in government means in a democratic
society. The Obama Administration has developed a website called Change.Gov, where they are asking for input from indivdual citizens on how to change government. Following is the post I entered today:

I work for United Cerebral Palsy of Middle Tennessee. In our state,
people with cerebral palsy and developmental disabilities other than
mental retardation do not receive dedicated DD services. In fact, our
State Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities
doesn’t even serve people with Developmental Disabilities. In my job, I
interact daily with young families who need intensive home and
community based supports that are not available to them. To make
matters worse, because our state has no intention of serving this
population, their critical needs are not even registered on a waiting
list.

More here.

Two Million Minutes: A Global Examination, Robert Compton on C-SPAN

<ed.note>Note: 1) China and India DO NOT emphasize junior high and high school athletics (because the chances that that will bring one out of poverty are amazingly low). 2) When a child shows an aptitude for a subject the parents hire a tutor (FWIW: South Korea sometimes hires from the States and Skylake Incuvest, a South Korean investment fund specializing in the technology sector, thinks there's money to be made here). Wouldn't it be weird if the US (the parents thereof) ACTUALLY valued STEM education (instead of just the politically correct rhetorizing about it)? Think of the boon a combined fiber and distributed clean energy generation smart grid build out model could be for rural economies and what a platform for virtual tutoring that eco friendly grid could be? BTW: I admin Project Net-Work Group on Linkedin.com — invite here if you're about more than lip service.</ed.note>

Text from C-SPAN, links mine: Robert Compton talked about his documentary Two Million Minutes: A Global Examination (Youtube Trailer here),
which compares and contrasts the education experiences of six students;
two from each of the countries of India, China, and the United States.
Video clips were shown as he talked about the statistics on the amount
of time spent in the classroom, the influence of the students' parents
on their decisions to pursue a certain career, and the degree to which
those choices impact their free time during their high school years.
Two million minutes is roughly four years, the amount of time high
school students have to prepare for higher education and their careers.
Mr. Compton talked about the importance of education to competing in
the new global economy and that people in other countries took it much
more seriously. He said that although many middle and high schools were
using his video, schools of education had rejected any need to learn
about the educational systems in competing countries.

Venture capitalist Robert Compton's travels to India in 2005 and
2006 laid the groundwork for his decisions to author a blog, publish a
book called Blogging Through India, and produce the documentary.

2008 Nonprofit Software Development Summit, November 17-19, Oakland, California

The latest greatest sessions and trainings list is posted on the Dev Summit wiki. We welcome others to add additional discussion or training topics. Complete details are here and you can register here. We hope to see lots of you there! Scholarships and sliding scale seats are still available. And PLEASE spread the word via blog, forwards, and other shout-outs!
Please let me know of questions.

thanks & peace,
gunner

Allen Gunn
Executive Director
Aspiration
+1.415.216.7252

www.aspirationtech.org

Dave H. Crusoe, Public Learning Media Labs, On CodeKindness

We at the PLML have *just* finished building a technology called
CodeKindness, which resides at http://www.codekindness.org. It’s nonprofit, and designed to mobilize technology volunteers for
nonprofit organizations by managing the distance volunteering experience.

We’re already testing it (successful, so far!) and would love additional input into designing/shaping the technology. Please let me know if you’re interested!

Cheers,

–Dave

dave at plml.org

Cambridge, MA

Remote Area Medical on 60 Minutes, Tennessee

<ed.note>It is both encouraging and discouraging to see that RAM does SO MUCH of its work here in Tennessee.</ed.note>

(CBS) This segment was originally broadcast on March 2, 2008. It was updated on July 9, 2008.

One of the decisive issues in the presidential campaign is likely to be health care. Some 47 million Americans have no health insurance, and that’s just the start: millions more are underinsured, unable to pay their deductibles or get access to dental care.

Recently, 60 Minutes heard about an American relief organization that airdrops doctors and medicine into the jungles of the Amazon. It’s called Remote Area Medical, or "RAM" for short.

As correspondent Scott Pelley first reported last March, Remote Area Medical sets up emergency clinics where the needs are greatest. But these days that’s not the Amazon. This charity founded to help people who can’t reach medical care finds itself throwing America a lifeline.