TN Legislature Chooses Not To Allow Broadband Provider Competition

AT&T Celebrates, Tennessee Families Go Another Year Without Internet Hope

House panel kills compromise on EPB broadband expansion to underserved areas of Hamilton, Bradley counties

Federal appeals court deciding municipal broadband expansion

Is Broadband Expansion Synonymous with Crony Capitalism?

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In the UK, the legislative mood is toward empowering build out enthusiasts:

    Proposal to apply Code Powers to Broadband for the Rural North Limited

  • construct and maintain infrastructure on public land (streets) without needing to obtain a specific street works licence to do so;
  • benefit from certain immunities from the Town and Country Planning legislation; and
  • apply to the Court in order to obtain rights to execute works on private land in the event that agreement cannot be reached with the owner of that land.

Establishing World-Class Connectivity Throughout the UK

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Fiber to the Press Release

Industry watchers often categorize these announcements as “Fiber to the Press Release“: AT&T bringing gigabit Internet service to Louisville This is of particular interest keeping in mind the Kentucky Statewide fiber backbone project called KentuckyWired [and no, there are no plans for TennesseeWired, TNREN or such; our legislators are spending their resources fighting with the FCC (under the states’ rights rubric) the effect of which is to deny municipalities the ability to offer fiber networks even though incumbent telcos and cablecos have no intention of building them.]

When you have a global collaboration and innovation infostructure you can accomplish wonderful things like:

BD2K All-Hands Grantee Meeting – November 2015 (Day 1)

BD2K All-Hands Grantee Meeting – November 2015 (Day 2)

GÉANT

The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE)

Today’s Meditation from Gary Holloway’s Daily Disciple

One of the treasures I have providenced across these last few years is Gary Holloway’s book Daily Disciple. It has the format Date, Theme, Psalm, Meditation, Scripture, Prayer. The Meditation comes from various writings of earlier leaders (read: guys with newspapers) in what has commonly become called the Restoration Movement by some, the Stone-Campbell or Campbell-Stone movement by others. It was launched by Reformers intending unity of Christians in the new-ish United States of America (they had the European religious wars pretty freshly in mind), not the unity-thru-division and Undenominational Denominations which often resulted later.

I was blessed to spend 4.5 years at the Disciples of Christ Historical Society (when it was located in Nashville before the on-going relocation to Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia [former homestead of Alexander Campbell]) as gopher, quasi-office manager, IT guy, etc. I didn’t realize until latter (of course) how blessed. I had the opportunity to meet several folks who kindled a love of sacred history, religious sociology, ekklesia economics, ecumenism, and the importance of archiving and indexing well; and when possible, digitally. I came with a faint grasp of the occult, comparative world religions, and a drive to “do something” with this world wide web. That drive has not left. But I digress…

I had the privilege for a time of assembling articles, ads, and various content, and then formatting Discipliana, the Society’s journal, as managing editor. I had not then grasped the long tail one’s writing could have; and especially now, the immediate and global “circulation” (see Bev Evans‘ special education resources as case study, amend stats to, by now, 12 million downloads in 258 countries). I was only beginning to grasp the future role of digital audio and video.

One of the “earlies” I have grown fond of thru Gary’s Mediation quotes (and some other writings discovered by way of DCHS board member and Discipliana editorial board suggestions) is Barton Warren Stone.

We are getting to be very fond of co-operating meetings. Can we not appoint one for the express purpose of praying to the Lord to give us his Holy Spirit? Do you not believe that he will give his Holy Spirit to them that ask him? I know you profess it. Such a meeting as this I should rejoice to attend before I die. – Barton W. Stone, Christian Messenger (1843), 272

I think the World Convention Global Gathering slated for India, January, 2017 would have encouraged them both to no end. I suspect both Stone and Campbell would have been amazed at the immediate, global reach that their journals might have had given today’s infostructure. I think also that the ability to convene cyberly, or virtually (Facebook groups, Google Hangouts, Skype, WebRTC, IRC, Slack, Yammer, and in intolerant nations, Tor tools) — and the ability to have “comment discussions” on web-hosted news portals would have captivated their imaginations.

The God Stone worshiped would have providenced the church with these tools to edify one another and to build one another up in the unity of the Spirit. I wonder what that God is doing today?

From Chameleon, with love

We love our users! That’s why for the last few months we have been working on a Valentine. Not the pretty picture – rather, we’d like to lay at your feet a bouquet of new capabilities that we hope will make your research easier and more productive. These include:

– Support for custom kernel boot. You can now easily customize the operating system kernel or modify the kernel command line in your experiments! While it was possible (just barely) to boot from a custom kernel before, it was also inefficient and slow for those of you who needed to do it repeatedly: each time, a user had to upload a new image with the customized kernel to the repository and then boot from that image; both time-consuming operations. You now have the option of modifying the boot loader configuration to point it to a new kernel on the local disk, or specifying kernel parameters and then rebooting using this modified configuration. This will make updates to the kernel take effect quickly and means that experiments requiring kernel development will be much easier to run. If you are not working with kernels, you will see no changes in how images are deployed – however, we have had to change image format of bare-metal images (from partition images to whole disk images) as well as image snapshotting instructions. To minimize the impact on you, we have converted all of the images supported by Chameleon and as many of the user images as we could; in order to convert others we may need your assistance on Monday. Note that your existing images have been renamed with a “.partition” suffix. If you would like to find out more about the feature, please read our bare metal user guide. We would like to thank our users Swann Perarnau of Argonne National Laboratory and Yuyu Zhou of the University of Pittsburgh for helping us define the details of this capability and working with us to test and validate them!

– Upgrade to Liberty. The OpenStack deployment which is a core component of CHI (Chameleon Infrastructure) has been upgraded to the most recent Liberty release. This upgrade not only facilitated the development of the feature above, but also added multiple usability features, such as the ability to edit compute image metadata from the project dashboard or the ability to deactivate an image, improved error messaging, improved performance of many features, and added administrative features that will allow us to make Chameleon operate more smoothly.

– Appliance Marketplace. The appliance marketplace allows you to discover, publish, and share appliances – bare metal or virtual machine images capturing the experimental environment – a key element of reproducibility. The initial version of the Appliance Marketplace announced in our New Year’s message was simply a static table of initial appliances provided and supported by the Chameleon team. The new Appliance Marketplace allows you to publish and share your own appliances so that others can discover them and easily play with the software and tools you developed. They can then use it either to reproduce the research of others or as a starting point for their own research and experimentation. To find out more, read the appliance documentation on our FAQ. We would like to thank Rosa M. Badia and her team of the Barcelona Supercomputing Center for motivating us to provide this capability sooner rather than later and for contributing the first external appliance representing COMPSs, a task based programming model for distributed platforms!

– Identity-based federation with GENI. For some time now, GENI users have been able to access Chameleon by using their GENI credentials and charging to the GENI Federation Project. Now Chameleon users will be able to use their Chameleon credentials to access GENI without having to create a GENI account! This will enable multiple additional advanced research projects. We would like to thank Tom Mitchell and Marshall Brinn of BBN on the GENI team for working with us to make this possible!

As most of you already know, these upgrades have already been applied at the University of Chicago site, and will be applied at TACC at the scheduled downtime next week.

We hope that these new features will reduce the time you spend wrangling logistics and put it back where it belongs: into your research. Thank you to all for sharing your requirements with us and inspiring us to make Chameleon a better testbed!

If you find Chameleon useful for your research, send us a Valentine at users@chameleoncloud.org! Here’s what we would like: a story of how you are using Chameleon for your research. Those stories are motivating not only to us in that they make us build a better testbed – but also to others who may get good ideas from your work on how to structure their own experiments. To encourage this sharing of experiences, we plan to highlight interesting research projects done by our users on the Chameleon portal as we have recently done with the story on cybersecurity research. In short, we’d like to challenge you to be an inspiration to other: if you have interesting stories to share, email them to users@chameleoncloud.org!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Kate Keahey
Mathematics and CS Division, Argonne National Laboratory
Computation Institute, University of Chicago

Ecclesiastical Rural Results Only Work Environments

John Hagel and John Seely Brown’s work re: innovation clusters, and their draw of the populace to them, is spot on; to my way of thinking, there is also a countervailing force now occurring1. As fast-enough broadband2 has proliferated both in the US3 and globally4 5 to smaller towns, they have been rewriting their core narratives6. I will be interested in seeing how small town congregations re-envision themselves, especially in light of the nexus of eldercare and this7.

  1. Brain gain in rural Minnesota
  2. What Kind Of Speed Matters for Broadband’s Economic Development Impact? – Strategic Network Group
  3. Community Network Map – Institute for Local Self-Reliance
  4. Animated map reveals the 550,000 miles of cable hidden under the ocean that power the internet – Business Insider
  5. Broadband for the Rural North #B4RN
  6. Toward a new narrative: How the Center for Small Towns crafts a different rural story
  7. The US uncompensated volunteerism industry

The US uncompensated volunteerism industry

The US for profit healthcare industry rests upon a vast ocean of uncompensated volunteerism:

Heavy toll endured by ‘invisible’ unpaid caregivers. A study published yesterday in the JAMA Network medical journal seems to state the obvious. Family members and friends who step up to help elderly or disabled adults sacrifice their own well-being.
http://www.digitaljournal.com/life/health/study-heavy-toll-endured-by-invisible-unpaid-caregivers/article/457833#ixzz40dcL57oC

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In 2009, about 42.1 million family caregivers in the United States provided care to an adult with limitations in daily activities at any given point in time, and about 61.6 million provided care at some time during the year. The estimated economic value of their unpaid contributions was approximately $450 billion in 2009, up from an estimated $375 billion in 2007.

Valuing the Invaluable: 2011 Update
The Growing Contributions and Costs of Family Caregiving
Lynn Feinberg, Susan C. Reinhard, Ari Houser, and Rita Choula
AARP Public Policy Institute

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Family caregivers in the U.S. spend an estimated 30 billion hours per year caring for older family and friends. That’s about $522 billion in care, according to a new Rand Corp. study, as measured by valuing the time caregivers have sacrificed in order to be able to provide care. – See more at: http://states.aarp.org/family-caregivers-provide-522-billion-in-uncompensated-care-per-year/#sthash.DUlY2pNi.dpuf

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Latest Estimated Value of Volunteer Time via Independent Sector

National Value of Volunteer Time: $23.07 per hour

The estimate helps acknowledge the millions of individuals who dedicate their time, talents, and energy to making a difference. Charitable organizations can use this estimate to quantify the enormous value volunteers provide.

According to the Corporation for National and Community Service, about 62.6 million Americans, or 25.4 percent of the adult population, gave 7.7 billion hours of volunteer service worth $173 billion in 2013.2 For the latest information, please see www.volunteeringinamerica.gov.
https://www.independentsector.org/volunteer_time

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VOLUNTEERING IN THE UNITED STATES — 2014

The volunteer rate was little changed at 25.3 percent for the year ending in September 2014, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. About 62.8 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2013 and September 2014. The volunteer rate in 2013 was 25.4 percent.
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.nr0.htm

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TIME BANKING

In economics, a time-based currency is an alternative currency or exchange system where the unit of account/value is the person-hour or some other time unit. Some time-based currencies value everyone’s contributions equally: one hour equals one service credit. In these systems, one person volunteers to work for an hour for another person; thus, they are credited with one hour, which they can redeem for an hour of service from another volunteer. Others use time units that might be fractions of an hour (e.g. minutes, ten minutes – 6 units/hour, or 15 minutes – 4 units/hour). While most time-based exchange systems are service exchanges in that most exchange involves the provision of services that can be measured in a time unit, it is also possible to exchange goods by ‘pricing’ them in terms of the average national hourly wage rate (e.g. if the average hourly rate is $20/hour, then a commodity valued at $20 in the national currency would be equivalent to 1 hour).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time-based_currency

Some Religious Sociology

Reading Emergence of the “Church of Christ” Denomination by David Edwin Harrell, Jr., Ph.D. about sociology’s view of the “sect to denomination” process as it applies to this American Reformation | Restorationist group and today’s Congregational Consulting Group’s PERSPECTIVES article by Sarai Rice on Denominational Dematurity.

Progression of “sect”, “institutional sect”, “denomination”; and life cycle of churches.

See also Generationally Rethinking Church with Dick Hamm.

GLORIAD News

Update: Insight Application

Greg Cole, Director, Center for International Networking Initiatives, The University of Tennessee, the Principal Investigator and Director, GLORIAD, passed these links along about the Global Ring Network for Advanced Applications Development:

Overview Movie: .mov (214 MB, download first, then play)

Former NSF Director, Subra Suresh speech re: GLORIAD Egypt launch: .mp4 (205 MB)

Former NSF Director, Subra Suresh talk re: GLORIAD and other efforts in India: .mp4 (39 MB)

AMCOST New GLORIAD Egypt/Africa effort: .mov .m4v Desktop Provides overview shots of the Africa Union Ministerial Meeting for Science and Technology, from March 7-10, 2010

GLORIAD/Tata Movie: Youtube

UT-produced Video re: GLORIAD: Youtube Greg Cole comments on GLORIAD’s role and potential

US NSF Press Release (Taj)

US State Dept Article

UT Quest Article

US NSF Press Release

GLORIAD dvNOC “click on GLORIAD-EARTH” tab to see live display of science applications using the network (updated every 10-15 seconds):

Recent GLORIAD newsletter from recent trip to India: (pdf)

Recent GLORIAD presentations

Zeeba, the Social Network Connecting the World of Science and Cyberinfrastructure

Play

When TNREN?

Bill Weber, WHYY Public Media’s VP and CTO, gave this presentation to the Philadelphia Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers on January 15, 2013 about KINBER / PennREN’s growing role in enabling Pennsylvania’s film industry.

The Keystone Initiative for Network Based Education and Research is a non-profit coalition of Pennsylvania’s education, research, healthcare, economic development and other non-profit based communities.

PennREN, the Pennsylvania Research and Education Network, is KINBER’s first project that will deliver a statewide platform for connecting its members through facilities-based fiber optic networking. PennREN will initially light over 1,600 miles of fiber on a middle-mile network that will connect over 70 locations.

Why should TN care?

FedGov (especially National Science Foundation) is recognizing the role of scientific discovery, research and education capabilities of #BigData on #HPC in the #Cloud. Getting the data into the cloud is the challenge best solved with symmetric gigabit upload and download speeds. Please see NSFCloud (CloudLab, Chameleon), and The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), etc. I am personally interested in #disintermedia applications such as those encouraged by the Knight News Challenge #Data, but I digress. TNREN would also allow us to meaningfully participate in Next Century Cities which may foster a GÉANT Association (see also DANTE) capability in the U.S. #education #film #genomics #healthcare #IoT #etc

Would like to know which Tennessee politicians will spearhead the building of Tennessee’s digital fiber backbone. Would be prudent if Nashville’s new mayor (I’m assuming there will still be an office of innovation) would be on board with the momentum I see coming from the likes of Sen. Janice Bowling (R-Tullahoma) and Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke.

Note also: Ohio’s OAR.Net, Kentucky’s KYwired initiatives (among others).

See also: Gigabit Libraries Network.

US Ignite Tutorial on CloudLab.US

I’m reviewing the US Ignite Tutorial on CloudLab.US, featuring an OpenStack Juno on Ubuntu 14.10 instance with a controller, network manager, and one compute node. This profile runs on either x86 or ARM64 nodes. It takes advantage of Vanilla Apache Hadoop, Hortonworks Data Platform, Apache Spark, etc.

CloudLab is a leading-edge laboratory for exploring and applying new computer cloud architectures at scale. The CloudLab infrastructure consists of three new clusters at U. Wisconsin, Clemson U., and U. Utah augmenting the existing Emulab and GENI (Global Environment for Network Innovations) distributed computing facilities. Each of the new clusters is aimed at providing hardware support for a different point in the cloud design space, and together they represent an extraordinary flexibility for computer scientists to try new ideas and for domain scientists to match CloudLab infrastructure to their applications.

CloudLab is a project of the University of Utah, Clemson University, the University of Wisconsin Madison, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Raytheon BBN Technologies, and US Ignite. CloudLab is part of the National Science Foundation’s NSFCloud program. To design and build the CloudLab facility, we’re partnering with three vendors: Cisco, Dell, and HP. Seagate has also provided a generous donation of hard drives.

Another similar project is Chameleon. Some videos here.

UPDATE: see also this additional recently announced project: Cornell to Lead NSF-Funded Cloud Federation for Big Data Analysis By David Raths 11/04/15